COLLECTED MEMORABILIA

Collecting the pieces of memorabilia and putting them back together.
One troubled soul trapped as an obscure writer & a coffee addict.
A girl whose tears are replaced by poetry; whose mind solely adores fragmented words.

1. Your skin may never be perfect, and that’s okay.

2. Life is too short not to have the underwear, the coffee, and the haircut you want.

3. Everyone (including your family, your coworkers, and your best friend) will talk about you behind your back, and you’ll talk about them too. It doesn’t mean you don’t love each other.

4. It’s okay to spend money on things that make you happy.

5. Sometimes without fault or reason, relationships deteriorate. It will happen when you’re six, it will happen when you’re sixty. That’s life.

—    Five things I am trying very hard to accept (via endangerment)

(via unimportant)

Reblog if you want one of these in your askbox:

askboxmemes:

  • A compliment or insult
  • A story
  • Why you follow me
  • If you met me what would you do
  • A cute message
  • One thing you want to tell me
  • One thing you want to know about me

(via scoobydoobydonttouchme)

me: sometimes i talk to myself
me: omg same

“ Although many writers had had periods of significant depression, mania, or hypomania, they were consistently appealing, entertaining, and interesting people. They had led interesting lives, and they enjoyed telling me about them as much as I enjoyed hearing about them. Mood disorders tend to be episodic, characterized by relatively brief periods of low or high mood lasting weeks to months, interspersed with long periods of normal mood (known as euthymia to us psychiatrists). All the writers were euthymic at the time that I interviewed them, and so they could look back on their periods of depression or mania with considerable detachment. They were also able to describe how abnormalities in mood state affected their creativity. Consistently, they indicated that they were unable to be creative when either depressed or manic. ”

—    The relationship between creativity and mental illness – a fascinating study based on writers from the prestigious Iowa Writers’ Workshop. Kurt Vonnegut was among the subjects. (via explore-blog)

(via langleav)